Shield's Tavern


Shield's Tavern, completed in January of 1989, is the reconstruction of a working 18th century tavern, which now functions as a restaurant. The tavern's name comes from James Shield, its proprietor from 1740 to 1750. The original tavern was destroyed around the time of the civil war and was first reconstructed in 1953 to be used as a private residence. In 1984 the exterior and interior were modified to recreate the tavern as it would have appeared in the mid-18th century. Outbuildings such as the store house, privies, smoke-house, and stable were adapted to provide service for outside dining and the tavern. The stable, a block away from the tavern with the addition of an elevator and stair tower, is the main service entrance to the Shield's complex. The geothermal well field is located in the area between the underground kitchen and the stable.

Clyde Kestner, Director Of Engineering, Colonial Williamsburg:
"We worked very closely with our design consultant, Wiley & Wilson, to minimize the impact on aesthetics and on the environment and to select the system with the lowest life-cycle cost."

Tim Scruby, Senior Engineer, Wiley & Wilson, Lynchburg, Virginia:
"The goals of the project were to provide mechanical systems (heating, air conditioning, refrigeration, and plumbing) that are consistent with the historic area environment."

Larry Rowland, Director of Energy Conservation, Colonial Williamsburg:
"It's a pleasure to talk about the energy profile of Shield's Tavern as it compares to our other three historic area taverns. Probably the most important yard stick we use is energy density per square foot per year. At Shield's, this figure ranges right around .4 million BTUs per square foot per year. In the other three operating taverns, it's more on the order of .7 or .75, so you can see that we actually enjoy a 40 percent efficiency bonus with this tavern.

"In terms of cost per square foot per year, Shield's is about $5.50 per square foot per year based on current electric rates. The remaining taverns average up around the $6.50 or $7 per square foot per year levels. So again if electricity rates remain favorable, it's a real good buy in the energy world."